Video Herstories

As part of the research for the exhibition, a series of interviews with women artists and writers involved in the Woman's Building was commissioned by Otis College.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9

The Woman’s Building History: Record Companies Drag Their Feet

Record Companies Drag Their Feet from JM Ven on Vimeo.

The collaboration between artists Suzanne Lacy and Leslie Labowitz Starus was pivotal in the production of radical new approaches to public performance and the development of alternative networks to support artists. After working together throughout the 1970's they decided to formalize a coalition of artists, activists, media reporters, and politicians built during their performances on violence against women.

otis.edu/public_programs/ben_maltz_gallery/womansbuilding.html

This video shown as part of the Getty’s Pacific Standard Time 2011-2012: Doin' It in Public: Art and Feminism at the Woman's Building
Ben Maltz Gallery
October 1, 2011 — January 28, 2012

The Woman's Building History: In Mourning and Rage

In Mourning and Rage from JM Ven on Vimeo.

A public performance art political action by Suzanne Lacy, Leslie Labowitz, Bia Lowe (Los Angeles, 1977)

In December 1977, Los Angeles waited in suspense as each new victim of the "Hillside Strangler" was broadcast on the evening's news. Soon there were ten women, strangled and dumped on the sides of roads. Media sensationalized these victims' lives, contributing to a climate of fear and superstition. In spite of a growing body of literature on the politics of crimes against women, stories focused instead on the randomness of the violence.

otis.edu/public_programs/ben_maltz_gallery/womansbuilding.html

This video shown as part of the Getty’s Pacific Standard Time 2011-2012: Doin' It in Public: Art and Feminism at the Woman's Building
Ben Maltz Gallery
October 1, 2011 — January 28, 2012

The Woman’s Building History: Stay on Message

Stay on Message from JM Ven on Vimeo.

In present day interviews, Suzanne Lacy and Leslie Labowitz discuss women's performance art during the late 70's, in the appropriate backdrop of Las Vegas where, in constant media interviews, they stayed on message that violence against women is wrong and that rape is not sex.
Edited by Teresa Flores.

Supported in part by a Grant from the Department of Cultural Affairs, Los Angeles to Otis College of Art and Design Legacy Integrated Learning Program. Special Thanks to Media Art Services, Suzanne Lacy, and Leslie Labowitz

The Woman’s Building History: Meaningful Participation

Meaningful Participation from JM Ven on Vimeo.

Suzanne Lacy and Leslie Labowitz discuss women's early participation in public performance around political issues around 1975-1980. "From Reverence to Rape to Respect" in Las Vegas is featured. By their participation in these public events, women often had the opportunity to work through their own experiences of violence in their lives.
Edited by Teresa Flores.

Supported in part by a Grant from the Department of Cultural Affairs, Los Angeles to Otis College of Art and Design Legacy Integrated Learning Program. Special Thanks to Media Art Services, Suzanne Lacy, and Leslie Labowitz

The Other Element

<

The Other Element from JM Ven on Vimeo.

In a present day interview with Suzanne Lacy, she discusses one of her installation pieces from the late 70's: "Voices in the Desert," exhibited in Las Vegas. The piece used lamb carcasses with showgirl headdresses and pearls, showing the metaphor of scantily clad women and slabs of meat in a buffet. Women were invited to write their stories on the walls of things that had happened to them in Las Vegas around violence. Edited by Teresa Flores. Supported in part by a Grant from the Department of Cultural Affairs, Los Angeles to Otis College of Art and Design Legacy Integrated Learning Program. Special Thanks to Media Art Services, Suzanne Lacy, and Leslie Labowitz